Goodbye, Adios, Adieu

clementine ending

I’m afraid this is the end of SteepClimbs as a regular blog.

With all this injury history over the last couple of years, I’ve contemplated pulling the plug many times. The only reason I haven’t is because, surprisingly enough, people still visit. Traffic has dropped slightly from where it was when I was riding and posting regularly, but not as much as I expected. Most of the people are reading the Climbs section, Rides, or Routes. Why stop something that many people find useful?

The answer is that I’m not. That information is going to remain up, but there will be no new posts and I will not be actively maintaining the site. At some point it will become outdated, but it should be useful information for many.

The reason is because I’ve finally come to terms with the fact that this part of my life is over. The injury to my hip went way beyond my worst expectations. Even now, more than a year later, I am facing the possibility of getting a resurfacing or replacement sometime this year. As much as I appreciate positive thoughts and encouragement, that’s not something I want to blog about. When I do get better and am able to ride, and someday I will, it will not be close to the level that I was at two years ago. Cycling will always be part of my life, but never like it was. I’ll probably go slowly, mix it up with other weight bearing activities, and most likely will never be the climber I was before. That might sound fatalist, but after 2.5 years fighting an injury, I’m fine with that. In fact, I am completely happy with this decision, and have found other activities to occupy my time.

Through this website, I’ve met countless friends, truly great people, far too many to mention. I can tell you one thing, that aside from a bad apple here and there, cyclists are people of incredible character. People forget that it is a social activity. Many have helped me by taking a pull when I’m tired, and I’ve done the same for others. That’s just what you do. Because of this website, probably more people than usual would be aware of this injury process. I’ve received some valuable advice that I have used. The fact that the injury has persisted has nothing to do with anything I’ve done or any of the advice I’ve been given. It’s simply a rough injury.

Many of you I already have met, and some have connected through email, social media and elsewhere. I’ll probably talk some about my progress on my personal Facebook. If you would like a friend request, feel free to drop me a note at the SteepClimbs page. Or you can find me through normal search channels. I’m not that hard to find.

You are welcome to join our 30 Day Fitness Challenges. If you have a Google Plus account, just drop me a note here and I’ll get you an invite.

I’ve always needed a creative outlet in my life, and even though I cannot write about cycling presently, I still have plenty to write about. Some may know that I recently finished a History and Film degree. I’ve been a film buff since I was a kid, and after surgery I started blogging about movies. That led to me getting back into The Criterion Collection, so now I blog about that. You are welcome to follow me at, just realize that my tastes are all over the place. I’ll talk about old French or Japanese art films far more than modern superhero action flicks, although I like everything. That blog and all those movies are what got me through the long recovery process. My personal Twitter is awest505, which I use regularly, but most of what I talk about is movie, TV, or music related. The Twitter I use for this website has long since been abandoned.

Thank you for following along this journey.

(Edit: Posted this to Facebook as a response to all the kind words)

Last word: when I pressed the ‘publish’ button this morning, I intended to walk away and not look back. I’ve been injured awhile and didn’t expect many people to notice. The outpouring of support, thanks, well wishes and encouragement has been unexpected and overwhelming.

I never expected to build something that would be interesting, helpful, or inspiring to people. A lot of people have said thanks. I would say “you’re welcome,” but “asante kushukuru” would be a better response. If you look it up in the Swahili-English dictionary, it translates as “you’re welcome” but that isn’t accurate. They don’t have a matching phrase in the language. The literal translation is “thank you for thanking me.” So, thank you for thanking me, because even though I’ve put in a lot of work, blood and sweat, it has been a true pleasure.

Plank Challenge Complete

High plank.

High plank.

I’m not usually a New Year’s Resolution kind of guy. My philosophy is that if you want to do something for yourself, like get into shape, you should just do it. Most people do not stick with their resolutions, mostly because their goals are lofty and they expect immediate results. The path to fitness requires a long-term commitment, with time and effort dedicated towards it every day.

This year is a little different for me. Believe it or not, today is the one year anniversary of successful hip surgery. The road to recovery has been slow, with a lot of highs and lows along the way, but I had finally been able to achieve some fitness gains toward the latter part of the year.

I bit the bullet and participated in a 30-Day Plank Challenge on New Year’s Day. My goal of 5-minutes was lofty, but I had a month to get there. Fortunately I made quick progress and achieved that goal within a couple of weeks. The real challenge was not reaching a certain time, but putting in an honest effort each day. It is not easy to get up every morning, eat breakfast, drink coffee, and do an exercise for a few minutes that makes you shake.

I didn’t stop once I reached the time goal. After modifying my way through week three, I committed to doing my best during the final week. The last level was to do Plank Jacks for as long as possible. At first I was under the misimpression that I was to move my legs inward and outward every 5 seconds, which made it a difficult plank, but easier than it could have been. I learned midway that it was actually supposed to be more like 1-2 seconds, continued movement, just like jumping jacks. There already was the shoulder and core pressure of the plank with the added component of cardio. Times dropped considerably for not just me, but everyone. This was a tough plank.

We were all relieved when level four was finished. We now had two days to attempt to reach our best time. As it turned out, I had a tough core workout on the eve of the first attempt from another challenge (which I will talk about later). From the first second of the plank, my shoulders and core started to shake. I managed only 82 seconds, and it was a fight to hold on even that long. Compared to the planks I had done throughout the month, this was a small number, but there was a good reason for it. I was simply all used up. Rather than get discouraged, I rested and tried again the next and final day, committed to putting together a good time.


This was my time. I was hoping to top five minutes and reach my best time of the entire month, but the remnants of my other workouts during the week worked against me. Still, that’s a tremendous time, and I could have reached five minutes probably if I were fully rested and recovered. It was a great way to finish and punctuate the challenge with style. I’m proud of sticking with it, but also for doing well.

The best planker in our group was Darrell. He put in a three-minute plank on day one, and continually put up the best times of our group all month. Like me, he had a bad penultimate number, mostly due to having a tiring day, but he came back for the final day. He finished his challenge with a respectable 5:31 time. He was the overall “winner” of the challenge, with 7,000 total seconds planked and the highest time.

Believe it or not, I was second. I surprised myself with how well I did. I was still quite a ways from Darrell, with just over 4,000 total seconds planked. The most important metric for me was the level of improvement over the month. I improved by 378% from my first plank, which was at the top of our group, although most everyone improved by an impressive amount.

This was a tremendous challenge and I’m glad to have been invited. It was just the motivation I needed. And it isn’t stopping here. We now have a February Challenge coming up soon, Squats, and I’m working on another intense challenge already that I’ll discuss soon.

Plank Challenge Week Three: Success and Modification

When I initially set out to try this task, I set a goal of three minutes, which I then stretched to five thinking it would be impossible and keep me motivated. Well, sometimes perseverance pays off. I reached five minutes this past week.


I could give it an asterisk for difficulty, but I won’t because I was fully suspended for the entire time, and had made incredible progress until then. After starting the challenge on New Year’s Day with a measly 63 seconds, I had gradually improved and achieved a high plank time of three minutes within about a week.

We then shifted to the second week and a tougher level. This plank had us alternating low and high planks, sort of like doing a half push-up every 5-10 seconds. I was dreading this, as my upper arm strength isn’t there for a large number push-ups, but I was surprised to find this challenge manageable. It was not easy, to say the least. One of the advantages is that you get to change positions. Even though transitions can be tough, the high planks were less punishing than the low planks. It also helped with the mental difficulty. Usually I do not watch the clock, but for these planks, I had to, and I began to think in the number of transitions. “I can handle one more cycle,” I would think, and that would be another 20 seconds. The cycles helped time pass faster.

I was regularly above three minutes as we neared the end of the week’s challenge. My penultimate level two plank was four minutes, which I felt great about. With one more of these remaining and the dreaded level three around the corner, I aimed to meet my goal at last. I had five minutes on my mind for that last plank. I played an upbeat, long song, and got to work. The last minute was a grind, and I was careful not to lose form. I shook and grunted, but managed to achieve the five minute mark.

There’s always adversity in life, and I found mine with level three. This plank is one legged. We start at regular plank position and alternate raising legs six inches off the ground. I worried this might interact with my recovering injury, and I was right. The first plank happened to be on a freezing cold morning, which is when the injury is at its most painful. It was no problem when I was raising my right leg, as the pressure and balance was on my left, uninjured side.

The first time I attempted lifting my left leg, I felt a twinge of pain. Hmmm. This might not be good, but at least to start, it was manageable. I’m used to enduring a little bit of pain as I progress through my recovery. I went through another cycle, and the pain was more pronounced. The problem was that when I had my left leg up, most of the pressure and balance was pushing inwards towards my core. My hip joint was absorbing most of it. There was a feeling of it being pushed from both sides. After a couple more cycles, it was continuing to hurt. I ended up stopping at 1:30, my weakest time since close to the beginning. On top of that, my hip felt off and the pain stuck with me the remainder of that day and the next. This type of plank was not going to work for me.

With the weather warming up and doing modified planks, the hip is feeling better again, but I have to find ways to challenge myself. For stage three, I’ve decided to come up with challenging, modified planks. This list is a great place to start.

For my modifications, I have done some brutal planks. One day I did an alternating forearm plank, which is pretty much the same as what the group is doing, only I lift my arms instead of my legs It puts more pressure on my arms and shoulders, while still working out my core and relieving my hip. I managed over two minutes and literally collapsed when I was finished. Tough plank.

15 - 1

Another modified plank was absolutely brutal, and required a little bit of trial and error just to get myself off the ground. I used the above medicine ball, and eventually ended up pushing off with my wrists into a high plank position. Even though high planks are usually easier, they were much, much harder this way because balance was a factor. I managed no more than a minute each, but tried it a couple times in order to get a good workout.

The remainder of this week will be about continuing to challenge myself but staying committed. Now that I have reached my time goal, the most important part is completing a worthwhile plank every day and accomplishing the challenge.

Plank Challenge: Week Two

Regular plank

Regular plank

Around mid-morning yesterday, I was telling my co-workers about this plank challenge. They were not just impressed; they were inspired. One of them asked if they thought if they could beat me in a plank challenge. I wasn’t intending to brag, but said that I would probably do better simply because I had been doing this for nine days. They took that as a challenge and rounded me and a couple others into the conference room for an impromptu plank challenge.

At that time I was wondering if I spoke too soon. I had just done a difficult plank a couple hours ago, so I doubted whether I’d have it in me to do a long one. Either way, this was happening. We got the stopwatch out, and four of us started doing planks with one serving as referee to make sure we stayed up and used proper form.

The challenger realized in an instant how difficult this was, yet managed to hang on for a minute. That was impressive for someone who hasn’t done one before. I knew that the biggest challenge would come from a guy who works out often. We were the last two remaining up at 1:30, and then he started shaking and decided to bail out. It was just me and a room full of cheerleaders. “Keep going, Aaron!” they encouraged me. I dug in and stayed up for a full three minutes, which was my best time since the challenge began. Even though that felt good, the plank wiped me out. I was out of breath, panting, exhausted. These planks are hard!

My first plank on New Year’s Day was 63 seconds. Everyday I have gained time gradually, and finally broke two minutes on the 5th day. By the time we changed from level one to level two, my best time had been 2:17.

High plank.

High plank.

For the second week, we switched to dynamic planks. We start in the regular plank position and alternate into a high plank every 5-10 seconds. It is almost like doing an awkward push-up, only not as difficult. I was worried on the first day whether I could handle this plank because I don’t have much upper body strength. To my surprise, that first day I had my best time to date at 2:30 minutes. Part of that success was because changing positions made it easier to a certain degree. The difficulty of a standard plank is in large part due to having to stick in an uncomfortable position. Mixing it up helps a little bit. At least it did that first day.

On the second day, I found that day one lulled me into a false sense of security. What I didn’t count on was getting sore arms from being in high plank position, which is a similar soreness as having done a number of push-ups. My second day in level two resulted in a setback. I could only manage two minutes, and found it a lot more painful. That was the same day as the plank challenge I did in the office, which reinvigorated me.

On the third day of level two, which was today, I managed my longest time doing any sort of plank – 3:03. I only beat my previous best by three seconds, but I’ll take it. The dynamic planks are now even more difficult than they were, but part of what this exercise has taught me is how to endure, just like with cycling. When it gets difficult, the biggest challenge is to hang in there, just as it is when you’re in the midst of a long, arduous and painful climb.

I’m not the only one in our group that has shown improvement. One of the guys has already reached five minutes, although in fairness, his first plank was three minutes and I think he had more experience going into this challenge. Aside from me and him, three other people have hit three minutes. Others have shown gradual yet consistent progress. Some have skipped days for whatever reason, while other seem to have given up on the challenge.

When I first started, I couldn’t imagine how difficult or how rewarding this challenge could be. For awhile I wondered whether I could even make it through the month doing this, especially with the dynamic planks in weeks two through four. Now I’m not quite as worried, and I am pretty confident that I’ll meet my five minute goal. After 10 days, my core already feels stronger. I have better posture and my back hurts less often.

This challenge was a great idea!

The 30-Day Plank Challenge

Happy New Year!

Millions of people have set resolutions to get themselves into shape. The gyms will be flooded on Monday, and that will last at least until the end of the month, perhaps longer. Eventually and unfortunately, a lot of people will cave on their resolutions.

I have not been that person, at least not for a great many years. New Year’s was just part of my off-season training regiment, which meant finding some sort of exercises to do indoors until the weather warmed up. If anything, January has been an annoyance because the gyms get crowded, and as sad as it is, I look forward to when people break their resolutions and give me more space.

Injury has changed that part of me. I’m now gladly joining the hordes of people with a New Year’s resolution to get back into shape. That starts with a 30-day Plank Challenge. That is not the only thing I’ll be doing, as I plan on a lot of cardio, but planks are going to be my primary motivator.

Regular Plank

Since I’m out of the habit of training, it is not as easy for me to motivate myself as it once was. This time I was invited to a Fitness Challenge group via Google Plus. This gives me motivation in spades. We have 38 other people in the group, and most of them are also participating. They post their progress daily. I’ve set my iPhone to give me Google+ notifications, so throughout the day I’ve been getting notified of people’s progress. Thus far it has all been positive. Everyone encourages everyone, and I’ve jumped in and done the same. We’re all in this together even if our goals and fitness are not the same.

Everyone’s situation is different. Some people are dealing with injuries like me. Naturally they are limited and looking for any sort of progress. Others are in peak shape and just looking for further toning. One person posted a picture of their abs to ask the group if we saw much definition (not in the “Meathead Rob Lowe” sense). Let’s just say that the definition of my abs would be found in the dictionary – maybe rotund, plump, overweight, or whatever. That will change this year.

The plan is to do a plank every day and stay up as long as possible. We track everyone’s progress on a shared spreadsheet that gives lots of useful stats, like the percentage of improvement, the average plank time, and so on. The goal is to improve every day and work up to a time goal. At first my goal was 180 seconds, but I decided to raise it to 300. I may not get there, and that’s fine, but I don’t want to restrict myself to a lower goal and get comfortable.

These are the areas that get worked out while planking. It is an efficient exercise.

These are the areas that get worked out while planking. It is an efficient exercise.

We have the month divided into four stages. For the first week we start with a regular/static plank, which is simply placing forearms on the floor, elevating the body onto the toes while keeping the back straight. Keeping form is important. When I did one of mine, I asked my wife to look to make sure my back was straight. If I feel myself losing form, then it is time for me to stop.

In the second week we’ll be doing a High Plank. This is where we start doing a regular plank, and then we move to a push-up position and alternate every 5-10 seconds. Needless to say, this will be more difficult and plank times will drop.

The intensity continues upward in weeks three and four. Stage three is a Single-Leg Plank, where we start at a regular plank and then raise one foot off the ground six inches and hold it straight, and then alternate every 5-10 seconds. Stage four are Plank Jacks, where we start from push-up position, and then jump our feet out into a jumping jack move and then back home, repeating every 5-10 seconds. The last two weeks might be more of a challenge because of my injury. It is possible I’ll have to modify, or maybe I’ll be able to do them normally and my hip will cooperate. It is unpredictable.

After these four weeks, we have two days doing the regular plank again, just to see the results of our month-long efforts. Hopefully this is when everyone, including myself, will reach or maybe surpass their goals.

So far, so good for me. On New Year’s Day, my plank time was 63 seconds. I wasn’t impressed, but improvement came fast. In four days, I have improved to 104 seconds, which is one-third of my goal.

The challenge will be done by the end of the month, but most likely I’ll keep planks into my repertoire. The core is an often neglected area in cycling training, yet it is also necessary for stability, bike control, and to maintain good form and reduce the chance of injury. I may decide to vary my planks to keep working the core. There are plenty of other variations to try.

On my way!

On my way!

2014: A Great Year Off the Bike

This past year was not about riding. It was about recovering. As long-time readers know, I have faced a number of physical challenges over the last couple of years. For a time, I had no idea what the problem was. It was not until surgery this past January that I learned about my injury. I continued to learn things throughout the year about how my body, and how my post-surgery hip.

Chilling before surgery.

Prior to having surgery in January.

What I didn’t do much was ride my bike. As I began to heal from surgery and progress with physical therapy, I gave riding a try during the summer. While I still had plenty of memory in my muscles and had retained some fitness, I wasn’t quite ready. My hip had not healed enough. I shut it down and it has been over six months since I was last on the bike.

My cycling stats are not too impressive:

6 rides
142 miles

And that’s about it. ‘Nuff said.

Given how much I love cycling, you would think that 2014 would be a terrible year. I’ll admit that it took some adjustment and was not easy, but I settled into a routine. Some great things happened for me, and oddly enough, 2014 ended up being one of the best years of my life. I’ve only talked about some of those things on this blog, because most have little to nothing to do with cycling. Forgetting about my lack of cycling, here is why 2014 was such a great year:


The best part of the year happened in February in my third week after surgery. My wife had been trying out for Jeopardy for nearly two years. She finally got the call to appear in early January. Her episodes would tape in February. The worst part was the timing. I was going to have surgery on January 31st, and initially I wasn’t even sure whether I could attend. My doctor helped me with that part. I attended and watched her triumph in one game, and then come in second place for the next game. I was so proud of her and it was the experience of a lifetime, even if the experience was physically painful and clouded by painkillers. I’ll still never forget it.

The tough part was not being able to say anything for about five months. I wrote this “VICTORY” post ahead of time, and scheduled it to publish after her episode had aired. We had a fantastic viewing party where many of our friends and family celebrated with us. She received a good bit of media coverage, which was something new to us, but it died down. I was extremely proud of her, and let her use this platform to talk about her experience.

Lady Liberty

We celebrated with a trip to New York City, which believe it or not was my first trip to the city. The trip consisted mostly of us doing tourist things, eating, drinking, and having a great time. Not only did we have a great time, but this was the first major breakthrough in my injury recovery. At first I was nervous that I would not be mobile enough to enjoy the city. You really have to walk to enjoy New York. I gave it a go and had trouble early on, and then almost miraculously, I felt fine. We walked, walked some more, and then continued walking.

The next major event was something that I’ve never really talked about here. Some would find it surprising that I’ve been a part-time student for the entire lifetime of this blog. As I touched on during some of my autobiographical posts earlier this year, I had some professional distractions. I had a company, sold it, and then landed a good job in a new career years later. This is hard to believe, but I have been in college, off-and-on, for 21 years.

I began this year close to graduating, but figured it would be sometime in mid-2015. Surgery turned out to be a blessing because I had a lot of free time during the first part of the year. I was able to occupy my time by taking remote or online classes in the spring semester. My professors were all understanding, and they gave me a breather for the first few weeks. Even though I wasn’t at my sharpest, I still managed to do well in those classes, and by the end of the semester, I was within sniffing distance of graduating. All I needed was one class.

I waited for a class that I would like, and that ended up being a Fall graduate class about a subject that I enjoyed. The class was difficult and consumed a lot of my time, while a busy year at work consumed the rest. This was part of the reason posting slowed here at SteepClimbs (and also because I was not riding).

Even though the last few months were among the busiest of my academic career, I finished and graduated just a couple weeks ago.

That's me on the left.

That’s me on the left.

The picture above was a selfie taken with 2,800 other graduates. The graduating class went up to the green light that you can see above my cap. The bearded smiling guy on the right gave me a photobomb, but he was a good sport. He could have done much worse!

Graduating itself was pretty awesome, but even better was being able to walk without assistance or pain. I had made a lot of progress during the year and it felt great. I walked to the podium with a wide smile on my face as I shook hands with the school president and dean.

Hilton Marina1

Hilton Marina2

We celebrated graduation with a trip to South Florida. The pictures above were from this past Saturday morning. I woke up early to see an incredible sunrise. Our hotel overlooked the Fort Lauderdale Harbor. The cruise ships were all returning from sea and they added to the gorgeous view.

My physical challenges are not completely out of the way. I’m still recovering from the injury. It looked initially like this would be a 12-month recovery, but it will most likely be a 12-16 month recovery. It is far better than it was, and most days I have no problem, but it is sensitive to cold weather. That was one of the reasons we went down south for a vacation. The warm weather makes a huge difference. While there, we walked again, just like in New York City. We probably walked about 50 miles in total and the hip felt great.

Even though I’ve been recovering from a rough hip injury, it has been a fantastic year!

To summarize all that happened to me:

  • Got my hip fixed.
  • Became a Jeopardy husband.
  • Graduated college.
  • Traveled North (New York City)
  • Traveled South (Florida)
  • Traveled West (Los Angeles)
  • Traveled East (Charleston, Hilton Head)

It is difficult to predict what will happen in 2015. I know that some great things will happen. I’m on pace to hopefully be fully recovered when the weather warms up in the spring. That should allow me to return to the bike once and for all, and then slowly rebuild my fitness. We already have plans to return to New York City in June, and hopefully I’ll be able to ride there a little bit.

Without school occupying my time, I’ll be able to dedicate myself more to fitness and continued rehabilitation. I’ve already joined a New Years Plank Challenge, which should help get my core back in shape. I’ll continue walking and might even try running as long as the weather and my hip allows.

There’s a good chance I’ll climb again in 2015.

As for my New Years resolution? I tend to aim high, and my goal would be something like this:

Independence Pass triumphant!

It could happen, right? If not this year, then the next. I’ll be surely and slowly working toward that goal, and one day I will get there.

Thanks for following along. Thanks for all of the words of encouragement and support. I hope you all had a tremendous 2014 and will have an even better 2015.


The Ben That Inspired Us


In case you haven’t heard, someone from the Carolinas won the Tournament of Champions. Ben Ingram has ties to a lot of places: Florence, Charlotte, Spartanburg, and yes, Columbia. He is a Florence native, went to school at Wofford and South Carolina, and currently works in Charlotte.

It’s no secret that Ben’s run was phenomenal, and we’ve enjoyed following along, at times from a distance, at times up close. His Jeopardy triumphs bookended our own experience, which is miniscule in comparison, but still something we’ll never forget. Our adventure, at least in our memories, will be inextricably linked with his championship and how he inspired us.

Ben’s run first aired in July of 2013. Coincidentally enough, that is right after the time Andrea auditioned in Nashville. Jeopardy was at the forefront of our minds and it was fantastic to watch someone from our region achieve such success. In the back of her mind, Andrea was probably thinking of strategies from all of the contestants. I think she paid extra attention to Ben, because she did employ a similar strategy when she made it to air. It worked for her.

This has been an active and highly publicized season for Jeopardy. When Andrea taped her episodes, Arthur had just begun his run. I believe he had won five games by that point, but in such impressive fashion that we wondered whether he would still be playing. Arthur quickly went viral. At first he was villainized for his unconventional, jarring strategy. That transformed as he went on, and a lot of people embraced him, including ourselves.

When Andrea taped, we heard about another upcoming championing that would be appearing at some point before her episode would air. We knew it would be a female, and we watched religiously, speculating which one would be the champ. It turned out to be Julia, and what a champ she was! With her infamous sweaters and bubbly personality, she became a media darling. She won 20 games, the 2nd most ever in show history. At first social media didn’t seem to notice, until she kept winning, and winning, and winning some more. Eventually she was doing interviews for major publications and TV shows.

During this time, we were preparing for Andrea’s episodes to air. It was tough to keep quiet about it, while planning for to celebrate with a viewing party at the same time. It was at this time that we engaged with Ben. He is active on social media, and if memory serves, he first took attention of us when I notified him that another Carolinian would be appearing soon. The three of us tweeted together. Since he was such an inspiration, it was nice to have him in our corner during the whole ordeal. He gave some valuable advice as to how to deal with everything.

One time he asked: “are you the steep climbs guy?” LOL. That’s me. It is not the first time I had been asked that question, but I would have hardly expected it from a Jeopardy champ.

We knew the Tournament of Champions was going to be coming up eventually, and we were sure that Ben had qualified, even though his first episodes taped over a year ago. We soon put our enthusiasm behind #teamben, rooting for the hometown hero that we had found to be just a downright good guy.

Ben won his quarterfinal match, and then obliterated the field during semi-finals. I’m not sure whether Arthur and Julia watched that match live. If so, they would have been shaken. Ben had two advantages. He was a formidable opponent and had become the forgotten dark horse. I tweeted the following:

Arthur retweeted it, which is interesting in hindsight.

A Fox News article came out about the Tournament of Champions, and they summarized it as a rivalry between Arthur and Julia. Ben wasn’t even mentioned. Instead, he became the “other guy.”

After Wednesday’s quarterfinal, we got an invite to the finals viewing party. It turned out he was having it at our hometown. It was short notice and the timing was actually terrible for us, but this was a chance to experience history. Not to mention it would be our second viewing party of the year, and this time all we had to do was show up.

The SC Jeopardy champs of 2014. The one on the right won a little more.

The SC Jeopardy champs of 2014. The one on the right won a little more.

We finally met Ben in person. He was just as charming, gracious and funny as he came off on TV. We met his family, including his mother who was at the screening. That meant she knew the outcome, but we knew better than to ask her. We’d been down that road, carefully deflecting the carefully worded questions trying to glean an idea of the results. We also met his girlfriend Liz, who was super cool. We met other members of the family that had flown in from Bismarck, ND. We met his brother, and plenty of his friends. He really has a wonderful family, and I could tell that they were all proud of him, although I don’t think any of them knew the outcome aside from his mom, who kept quiet.

Ben has a sense of humor too. This was his Julia reaction shot.

Ben has a sense of humor too. This was his Julia reaction shot.

We cheered loudly as the show went on. Ben played smart, and even though he fell behind Arthur, he completed his successful streak of answering every Final Jeopardy completely. It was a brutal question that both Arthur and Julia missed. We didn’t know it either. I doubt anyone else in the room did. Ben knew. Ben always knew. Well, almost always.

He had a $10,000 lead. I congratulated him, and he reminded me that this was a two-day competition. Anything can happen. He’s exactly right. His competition was fierce. I was impressed by how well he kept the secret, but I also remembered how quiet we had been. It was difficult for us, and Andrea only won a game. Ben had won the championship. I’ll bet that deep down, he felt euphoric and wanted to scream and yell the results. His exterior was cool, composed, and revealed nothing.

The final night had some tough questions and a brutal Final Jeopardy. Nobody got the answer. The question was which Shakespeare play had a place named in the title that was not in Europe. The Answer was Pericles of Tyre. Ben was a Mathematics major, and he made a smart, safe wager. It was good enough to win.

When Andrea had won, both of our phones blew up. It took days, weeks even to get through all the emails, social media notifications, and to finally come back to reality. I cannot imagine what it was like for Ben. There’s already a Wall Street Journal piece on him, and I expect many more articles in the coming days.

I expect him to continue to be successful, and he’ll probably play Jeopardy again some capacity. Maybe another Battle of the Decades, or maybe he’ll play Ken Jennings, Brad Rutter, a computer .. or something. Jeopardy likes trotting their champions back out, and Ben is one that they, and we, can be proud of.

Congratulations Ben! Enjoy the celebration!

ben champ


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